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Trust President and vice Presidents

Dr C.G. Barnes

Colin Barnes qualified in medicine in 1961 at The London Hospital Medical College (University of London). He was appointed Consultant in Rheumatology at The Royal London Hospital in 1968 and subsequently became Clinical Director of Rheumatology. He was also Consultant Rheumatologist to Notley Hospital and St. Luke’s Hospital for the Clergy. He retired from the NHS in 1996 and from clinical medicine in 2001. He was also Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Arthritis and Rheumatism Council (now the Arthritis Research Campaign), Chairman of the management committee of the Kennedy Institute, President of the British and European Leagues against Rheumatism and President of the International Society for Behçet’s Disease.

Professor Sir Ravinder Maini (President)

Professor Sir Ravinder Maini is Emeritus Professor of Rheumatology at Imperial College and was appointed the Scientific Director of The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology in 1990 and Head of the Kennedy Division upon its merger with Imperial College until his retirement in 2002.

His research as a clinician-scientist, which he continues to pursue, is on the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis and targeted biological therapy of immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. He has published over 480 scientific papers, is co-editor in chief of a journal and serves on a number of medical charities and scientific advisory boards of international biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. He is a non-executive director of a mutual not-for-profit provider of professional indemnity to Doctors and of a research and development health sciences company in India.

He has received international recognition for his work, including honorary doctorates from University René Descartes, Paris and the University of Glasgow, and the Distinguished Investigator Award from the American College of Rheumatology. He is the recipient of a number of awards jointly with Professor Feldmann, for their discovery of anti-TNF therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, including the Crafoord Prize from the Royal Swedish Academy in 2000, the Albert Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award in 2003 and the Paul Janssen Prize in 2008. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians London.

Sir David Sieff

Mrs Lois Sieff

Mrs Bella Sunley

Trustees

Professor Andrew Cope

Andrew Cope graduated in Medicine from the University of London. After training in general internal medicine at Northwick Park Hospital, The National Hospital for Nervous Diseases and the Royal Brompton Hospital, he trained in rheumatology with Prof Sir Ravinder Maini and Dr Barbara Ansell CBE. In 1990, he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Clinical Training Fellowship, studying for a PhD in Cytokine Biology with Prof Marc Feldmann at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology. Following a postdoctoral fellowship with Prof Hugh McDevitt at Stanford University, California, studying transgenic models of autoimmunity, he returned to the Kennedy Institute to set up his own laboratory. In November 2008, he was recruited to the Arthritis Research UK Chair of Rheumatology at King’s College London where he currently leads the activities of the Academic Department of Rheumatology in the Division of Immunology, Infection and Inflammatory Diseases.

Dame Nicola Davies (Deputy Chair)

Dame Nicola Davies is a High Court judge with a background in medical and criminal law. She is also a Bencher of Gray's Inn.

Mr J.P.L. Davis (Chairman)

James Davis succeeded Sir Richard Butler as Chairman in 2008. On graduating from Balliol College, Oxford in 1968, he joined the City law firm of Freshfields, becoming a partner in 1976. He was a specialist corporate lawyer, advising a number of large listed companies, private equity houses and investment banks. He opened the firm's office in Singapore in 1980 and served on the Partnership Council for six years. He retired as a partner in 2006, continuing as a consultant. He is also a Director of Aggregate Industries Limited and a Trustee of Sutton's Hospital in Charterhouse.
He is married with four children. Interests include fishing, golf and walking.

Margaret Frost

BA History of Art, Wellesley College, Boston; MA History, Somerville College, Oxford; CFA

Margaret has been Head of Generalist Portfolio Management at Rogge Global Partners, a long-established specialist bond manager, since 2010.

With over 28 years’ experience of fixed income investment, Margaret was previously head of bond research at Towers Watson where she became the first woman on the investment consultancy’s global investment committee. Before that, she was a senior vice-president at the Kuwait Investment Office and also spent eight years as a global fixed-income fund manager at Citibank. She began her career in capital markets, working in institutional bond sales, and moved over to investment management in 1990.

Margaret and her husband are patrons of the Donmar Warehouse and the National Theatre.

Professor J.S.H. Gaston

Hill Gaston has been Professor of Rheumatology at Cambridge since 1995; he qualified in medicine at Oxford, obtained a PhD at Bristol and postdoctoral training at Stanford, before moving to Birmingham where he was a Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Research Fellow. His research interests are in immunological aspects of arthritis and its relationship with infection.

Professor Stephen Holgate

Stephen Holgate is Medical Research Council Clinical Professor of Immunopharmacology at the School of Medicine, Southampton, UK. After completing his medical training in London he spent 2 years at Harvard Medical School to acquire skills in allergic disease mechanisms. On returning to Southampton in 1980, he set up a research group focused on the mechanisms of asthma. He has utilized many approaches to study this disease including epidemiology, genetics, pathology, microbiology and immunology, pharmacology and experimental medicine. This research has informed guidelines on asthma management and has identified and validated novel therapeutic targets.

His work has resulted in over 980 peer reviewed publications (H index 130) 60 Book editorships, 450 Book Chapters and Reviews, 48 Editorials, 68 Official and Government Reports. He holds an MRC programme grant focused on the pathogenesis of asthma over the lifecourse. He is a Past President of the British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and British Thoracic Society. He was Chair of the MRC Population and Systems Medicine Board and Member of MRC Strategy Board (2007-12) and is Chair of Panel A (covering Medicine, Health and Life Sciences) of the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (to assess research and impact in all UK Universities over the previous 5 years). He is Chair of the UK Government Advisory Committee on Hazardous Substances and Member of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants.

He is a Past President of the British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and British Thoracic Society. He was Chair of the MRC Population and Systems Medicine Board and Member of MRC Strategy Board (2007-12) and is Chair of Panel A (covering Medicine, Health and Life Sciences) of the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (to assess research and impact in all UK Universities over the previous 5 years). He is Chair of the UK Government Advisory Committee on Hazardous Substances and Member of the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants.

Mr R. Hornstein

Rodney Hornstein is an entrepreneur and business angel specializing in the information technology sector. A liveryman of the Company of Information Technologists, he is presently chairman of the board of five technology related companies. He serves as chairman of the Trust’s Finance and Investment Committee.

Mrs J. Johnson

Jennifer Johnson is a member of the Development Board, National Portrait Gallery since 2004 and a lay member of the Joint Research Ethics Committee of the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Institute of Neurology since early 2008.

Professor Sir Ravinder Maini (Trust President)

Professor Sir Ravinder Maini is Emeritus Professor of Rheumatology at Imperial College and was appointed the Scientific Director of The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology in 1990 and Head of the Kennedy Division upon its merger with Imperial College until his retirement in 2002.

His research as a clinician-scientist, which he continues to pursue, is on the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis and targeted biological therapy of immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. He has published over 480 scientific papers, is co-editor in chief of a journal and serves on a number of medical charities and scientific advisory boards of international biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. He is a non-executive director of a mutual not-for-profit provider of professional indemnity to Doctors and of a research and development health sciences company in India.

He has received international recognition for his work, including honorary doctorates from University René Descartes, Paris and the University of Glasgow, and the Distinguished Investigator Award from the American College of Rheumatology. He is the recipient of a number of awards jointly with Professor Feldmann, for their discovery of anti-TNF therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, including the Crafoord Prize from the Royal Swedish Academy in 2000, the Albert Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award in 2003 and the Paul Janssen Prize in 2008. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians London.

Mr D. Paterson

David Paterson joined the National Association of Pension Funds as head of corporate governance in April 2006, on his retirement from JP Morgan Asset Management. Apart from corporate governance and executive remuneration policy, he has worked on private equity, hedge funds, securities class actions and corporate social responsibility issues on behalf of the NAPF. He is a trustee of the JPMorgan UK Retirement Plan.

Mr Paterson graduated from the University of St Andrews in 1969.

Sir Gregory Winter, CBE, PhD, FRS, FMedSci

Member of staff of Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Cambridge from 1981 (Deputy Director, 2006 -2011; Acting Director, 2007–08) and Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge (1976-1980; 1991-present).

Greg Winter is a scientific pioneer of protein engineering, and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, and an inventor and entrepreneur. He invented techniques to both humanize (1986) and, later, to make fully human antibodies for therapeutic uses. His technology is used in over two-thirds of the antibody products on the market, including the humanized antibodies Campath-1H, Herceptin, Avastin, Synagis and the first human antibody (Humira) to be approved by the US FDA. Greg was a founder and Board Director of Cambridge Antibody Technology (1989); the company pioneered the use of antibody repertoire technologies to make the human antibodies (floated on the LSE in 1997 and acquired by AstraZeneca in 2006).

Greg was also a founder and Board Director of Domantis (which pioneered the use of domain antibodies - which use only the active portion of a full sized antibody - and which was acquired by GSK in 2006), and more recently of Bicycle Therapeutics, a biotechnology company developing a platform technology that enables the creation of a new generation of biotherapeutics which combine the desirable features of small molecules and biopharmaceuticals to create highly specific and highly stable drugs.

He has won a number of international prizes and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and of the Academy of Medical Sciences; an honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, of the Royal Society of Medicine and of the Australian Academy of Technological Science and Engineering; and a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. He received his knighthood in 2004 for services to science.

In December 2011, Greg was appointed Master of Trinity College with effect from October 2012.

Staff

Pierre Espinasse

General Manager

Susan Preston

Secretary to the Board